23 Dec 2016

Cambodia Maid

Winter: Having a new source of supply is fantastic but if these FDWs are here with holidaying minds and are more interested to make employers vomit tonnes of blood then what's the difference in having a new source country? Cheaper doesn't mean we ought to suffer in FDWs/Agents' hands.  Believe Employers are willing to train FDWs and make them adjust to the households but how many flew over with a good mindset and working attitude?  A lot felt they deserved to be treated well yet not reflecting on their performance.  懒惰不自动 不思前进只想不劳而获 怨天怨地以为雇主欠或剥削了她 

Fresh and seasoned FDWs felt employers owe them good lives and expect to be babysitted for many months or as long as they are employed.  Tolerated and then forced to accept FDWs' culture/bad habits/poor working conduct instead of FDWs, learning, improving and adjusting to our ways of life... is certainly not right.  Current market trend is so unhealthy and damaging to employers' pocket.  

FDWs are not stupid, they know how to play lazy games (don't know/can't do well means one task lesser), take an inch for a yard and took things for granted because you gave in, showed kind concern and understanding... too nice will be bitten by unappreciative and demanding FDWs.  
More maids from Cambodia next year, Straits Times, 23 Dec 2016
Maid agencies plan to bring in 1,000 to 1,200 maids from Cambodia next year - three times the number now in Singapore.  The Manpower Ministry approved Cambodia as the 13th and latest source country for domestic workers in October.

Ms K. Jayaprema, who oversees the 340-strong Association of Employment Agencies Singapore, said yesterday that these figures were "a conservative estimate" and more could be recruited in future.  
A lukewarm pilot programme that began in 2013 saw six agencies struggle to recruit 400 domestic workers because of factors like the language barrier.  "That was to be expected - teething problems that arise with a new source country that some may be sceptical about," said Ms Jayaprema. "But as more agencies get on board, employers will also slowly become more familiar with Cambodian maids."

To tackle the language barrier, agencies are focusing on training new workers and helping them learn English.  "We will hand-hold our member agencies and assist them with training," said Ms Jayaprema, who led a team from 26 agencies to meet Cambodian counterparts earlier this month. "As a source country, I don't see Cambodia as too different from Myanmar."

There are about 237,100 foreign domestic workers in Singapore. Maids from Myanmar account for around 13 per cent, but the majority still come from Indonesia and the Philippines.  Maid agency Nation Employment, which took part in the pilot, welcomed the addition of Cambodia as a source country. It has brought in about 250 Cambodian maids to date.

"Our employers appreciated the helpers we brought in. Many of them had experience working in Malaysia, and some could also speak Mandarin or dialect," said managing director Gary Chin.  "They may not be the preferred choice but, given time, they can be one of the choices."

But another agency in the pilot, whose operations manager asked not to be named, said her company will not bring in more Cambodian maids for now.  "While their slightly lower salary might be attractive to some, language is still a huge barrier," she said. Monthly wages for Cambodian maids stand at roughly $450 for new workers and $500 for experienced ones, while Indonesian and Filipino maids must be paid at least $550 a month.

Other firms, like Orange Employment Agency, are adopting a wait-and-see approach.  Owner Shirley Ng said: "For now, Cambodians don't seem to be a popular option. Their employers would probably be those who are more patient as they have to deal with the language barrier."

Ms Jayaprema noted that Singapore must compete with markets like Taiwan and Hong Kong for workers from traditional source countries, which have in turn expressed their desire to have women leave only for more skilled jobs.  "Taking all these factors into consideration, it is only wise that we cast our net wider," she said.

Facebook comments:
Zo Cher -- Oh no....i had 2....high hopes on them with loads of patience and got trainer to guide them. Sorry to say they are not as expected and have to bid goodbye. Its the culture and mentality so we can't blame them.

Mai Jio Wa -- Heee Heee! There people are not maid material. You can repeat the same instructions to them daily and yet they mess up. Believe me... I know. Used to have 30 of them working for me in Cambodia. Vomit blood and get hyper tension ! Looks nice but more like statues. Work aside ... They are wonderful people! Cheers!

Liow Kian Tat -- Is not the quantity that matter... It's the training that we hope agencies look into when they bring in the helpers.

Kong Hui Poh -- Train, no train, not an issue. It is the culture, hard to crack

Liow Kian Tat -- Kong Hui Poh That's not true... Culture is easy to blend in. The issue is agencies are about earning $ which we can't blame them but basic training is needed.

Lai Yin Lee -- every household is different. what is important is the willingness to learn.

Mai Jio Wa -- Cannot work one la ! The experienced ones are rejects from Malaysia la ! Good luck !!
Btw... Agencies earn more for rejected maids.

Ewan Hijrah -- The agencies must train them most of the agencies i see they just shake their legs WITH HANDPHONE and Know how to EARN MONEY ONLY ..

Yogo Mojoo -- When you bring in ppl frm 3rd world countries and let your kids be looked after them you'll get third world standards,that's why our kids are so ...............?

Tanyeo Oppa -- yeah think time to import maids from other nations too as 1 of the indo maid caught got association with isis despite indonesia effort to catch terrorist


Halting start to Cambodian maid pilot scheme, TODAY, 21 Sep 2013
The plan was for six selected employment agencies to bring in 400 workers from Cambodia, in a bid to meet the demand for maids here.  But the pilot programme by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) appears to be getting off to a slow start, with three of the participating agencies reporting challenges in bringing in workers.

One agency has only brought in one worker since the programme kicked off in May, while the other two said they have brought in “a handful”. Their counterparts in Cambodia claim “political strife” was limiting their ability to send workers here, the agencies said.

The crux of the problem is that there are only three agencies in Cambodia for this pilot, so supply is rigidly controlled and we are at their discretion,” said Mr Ronnie Toh, owner of A C Toh Enterprises, one of the six participating agencies. “It is quite frustrating, because we are hungry for the workers, and they are all good and well-trained,” he added.

The agencies suggested that more agencies in Cambodia be roped into the programme to boost supply.  The pilot is scheduled to run until 2015. If successful, Cambodia could be added to the MOM’s list of approved source countries and territories for maids, lowering Singapore’s dependence on maids from the Philippines and Indonesia.

Responding to queries, an MOM spokesperson said: “The objective of the pilot scheme is to assess if Cambodian foreign domestic workers (FDWs) are suitable to work in Singapore households, and Cambodia as a viable source country.

“The selection of Cambodian recruitment agencies is solely the prerogative of the Cambodian government. The MOM will not interfere in the domestic FDW supply processes in Cambodia, as this constitutes part of the ground situation for a realistic assessment of Cambodia as a potential new source of FDWs.”


Ms Connie Sim of Prestige Management Services, another participating agency, said the trickle of maids from Cambodia is understandable. “Singapore has very high standards for domestic workers, so we’re looking at hiring those who have had experience in Malaysia,” she noted. “It’s a pilot project, and we want to make sure the girls are well taken care of and proper regulations followed.”


‘Abused’ maid awaits return, 8 July 2014
A woman who was taking part in a pilot scheme to place Cambodian maids in Singapore is waiting to be repatriated after being molested at her employer’s home and allegedly mistreated by a recruitment firm, she said yesterday.

Lok Samean, 34, was initially made to sleep in the same room as an elderly man who molested her twice, she said, before she asked the agency for a transfer.  Samean said that after her new employer did not let her use a phone she returned to live and work at recruiter Nation Employment, where she alleges she was treated badly for months.

“It was a very difficult time, because I did not have enough food. Every day, I just had a little bit of rice and cabbage with water and salt. The food looked like pigs’ food,” she said.

Nation’s managing director, Gary Chin, rejected those claims yesterday, inviting a Post reporter to visit its boarding house in Singapore and interview workers there.  “By then, the truth will speak by itself,” he said, going on to say that Samean had lived at Nation for only a month before fleeing to an NGO-run shelter and forgoing a transfer.

Samean recently decided to withdraw a police complaint she filed against the man who molested her, she said, because she just wants to return home.  “If I file a complaint, I must stay here for six months without any work.”

Last week, two other Cambodian maids were repatriated from Singapore citing overly strenuous working conditions.  But Lao Ly Hock, general manager at Philimore Cambodia, which sent both Samean and these maids to Singapore, said that only a small percentage of about 250 Cambodian maids had encountered these problems.

“We cannot do it 100 per cent perfect.… I am now waiting for a letter from Nation and the employers to explain what happened to the maids. I am also wondering why the maids had to work 16-hour days without any rest days,” he said.

Ly Hock also accused rights groups like Licadho of not allowing returning maids to speak to agents before going to the press.  Licadho investigator Am Sam Ath said yesterday that NGOs step in because agents are not doing enough.  The Cambodian Embassy in Singapore said in an email on Friday that it was providing consular assistance to all Cambodian maids, including Samean.

It said that in general maids were “well treated and received” but admitted that some Singaporean employers could be demanding and that “quite a few” maids had complained of overwork and inadequate rest.


Maids alleged mistreatment4 July 2014
Two Cambodian maids were repatriated from Singapore on Wednesday due to what they claim were overly strenuous working conditions.

Cambodian maids began travelling to the rich city-state late last year as part of a pilot program.  Phon Mao, 24, said yesterday that she had been sent to Singapore at the end of last year by recruiter Philimore Cambodia after working in Malaysia.

“I had to do so much work in a three-storey house from 6am to 10pm every day without any days off. I asked my employer for a day off, but they said I would meet men and did not allow me. I endured working like this for six months, but then I decided to run away and ask an NGO for help,” she said.

Domestic workers in Singapore aren’t covered by the country’s labour law and do not have regulated working hours. They are granted a weekly rest day but can agree to forfeit them for extra pay.  Mao explained that she initially signed a contract agreeing to no rest days on her employer’s urging.

According to Shelley Thio of Singaporean group Transient Workers Count Too, it was clear that Cambodian workers had been led to believe that working conditions in Singapore would be far better than Malaysia, despite long working hours being a “systemic problem”.

Yem Thida, 31, also returned on Wednesday after nine months in Singapore.  “Before, I heard that Singapore was a modern country without labour exploitation like in Malaysia, and I really wanted to go to work as a maid, but in fact, I had to work for 18 hours every day without time off.”

Labour Ministry spokesman Heng Sour could not be reached, while Secretary of State Om Mean declined to comment.  Association of Cambodian Recruitment Agencies chief Ung Seang Rithy said recruiters had done nothing wrong.  “They wanted to come back by themselves. The employer was not happy with [Mao] having a boyfriend and the way she worked, so the company agreed to send them back . . . I ask you, did she have any injuries or signs of mistreatment? No.”


Winter: Extracted commments from maid's Facebook.  This is an activist (An) page that provides DIY employer/FDW at your own risks, no agent involved.  Not providing any hyperlink to help it generate traffic.  The 'organiser' is in good relationship with HOME - a haven for runaway maids.  

Above 'mistreatment' wasn't published in Spore papers.  I'm surprise our media is not covering above to make employers look extremely bad.  Could it be media finally realised there are too many princess maids in Spore and some come with the real intention to find love at Employer's expense?  FDWs are here to have fun, work short hours, little chores and get into a relationship?  

Sometimes, an unproductive maid is the real cause for her long working hours.  My only Indonesian maid, M and 3 other Filipino maids were totally different.  My Indonesian maid took more than 1 hour to bring my daughter home from school, via mrt... M went missing on a number of occasions and sometimes claimed she was in the toilet (about 30mins, how to believe such coincidences?)).  M took a lot time to pack things that are daily routine.  M needed a long time to get herself dressed and ready to move out.  When I asked her to do chores, she needed double or more time to complete, regardless simple or 'complicated'.  When activists said maids are working 12 to 18 hours each day, did you compare and put different persons to test?  Did you time how much time individuals carried out their tasks?  Some FDWs seem programmed to be slow & lazy worker ....act blur like sotong, made mistakes on purpose...  Maid is slow/lazy, you can't stand it so some employers decided to take over the maid's work.  Some employers know the maids are just trying their luck for lesser chores so they let their FDWs take their own sweet time to complete tasks.  I told my FDWs, the earlier you finish your tasks properly, the earlier you get to rest.  My chores are standard.  My instructions are as per training.  Mess up or deliberately do wrong, you got to get it right... practice makes perfect! I do not add on tasks if FDW looked very free.

 I'm unable to translate into English. 
Lynmar Terpe: Im also one the applicant sa nation agency na yan... Sos diko makalimutan kasama ko na pinay from la union binato ng telepono. Totoo binugbog na gulay at kanin at asin lang pakain nila sa boarding house. Tapos salary deduction 6to 8 months. To much sila diyan pati staff na pinay sa agent sila pa mga nanakit sa kalahi nila.. Thanks god nakakuha ako agad ng mabait na amo...bad experience sa nation agency.pag maligo ka sa cr madalas lima kau sabay. Hubot hubad. Buti na lang lahat mga babae. Hay buhay...


Leon Tina: Bad agency ever!
Mdm tiger as bording house runner like to call us BAbi (anak Babi/pig).especialy when she's not in mood.
I will never ever forgotten how she treat us when my first time came to spore for work.


Bhe A. Peñalber: TRUE..! agency well take, phone, $ and jewelry of new arrival Ofw... Call home after they arrived here is not allowed until salary deduction was fully paid... And every day while ur still in agency, they will rant you over and over how much u owed them...while you in other hand suffering, fatigue (lack of sleep, food) the verbal abused continues... And the worst you cannot choosed employer agency will chooosd a Hurried employer for quick bucks... Wondful experience..!


Kimkim Castro: Agency will cost us the exact payment of their service but they dont give enough needs while staying there,,especially foods and proper place to sleep,,no mat and blanket...


Gabrielle Fuentes: It's true,Nation agency doesn't treat u like a human being.if it's possible to live with just water alone,they won't feed u


Ecila Garcia Halos: lahat ng agency ang trato nila sa mga maid nila ay hindi makatao...pero hindi natutulog ang Dios nakikita niya lahat kaya pagbbayaran din nila lahat yan pagdating ng araw...


Kaycharm Espinosa Alagao: But its true my sister and my nice is from nation agency and they told me that they dont have food to eat so i told my boss about this then boss ask me to cook a nice food and bring it to nation office at taopayoh and the staff are not that friedly


Tan Peralta Carolyn: Nation Agency....Parang .galing ako sa bording house nila, kc kumare ko 2 times daw na himatay,,, ithinks dahil sa food nla, kc rice, cabbage daw lagi kinakain nila..... ang dami applicante duon,,,, halos mga 1 month naghihintay ang mga iba, magkaruon ng employeer...aaaammm


Ann-Jems Ortega Reyes: Again last 2005 sister inlaw ko minaltrato din matulog ng 1am mglaba kamay mgmop kamay may camera pa ang bahay sa CR cya pinapakain; so ngcomplain cya sa agency mgtiis daw kc my utang pa sa kanila pero hndi na nya kaya ayon bumalik sa agency pinagalitan hndi pinakain ng 2 days at pauwiin daw sa pinas sugurin ko nga ang agency kasama ko amo kong puti ayon hands off ang agent takot dinala ko sister inlaw ko sa bahay ng amo ko at hinanapan nmin nv amo hndi ko na binayaran ang agency NO WAY!!!


Ann-Jems Ortega Reyes: Me too 1999 pgdating ko sa agency galing pinas sa dorm kmi natulog cartoon ang higaan 1 slice bread brkfast friedrice with out anything ang sa dinner noodles ang lunch tapos maligo lima kmi sa banyo horrible life..pgdating sa agency bago kunin ng amo lahat na gamit ulongkatin kunin ang cp relo polbo lotion pinahubad pa kami ng assistant para tingnan kong meron ba kmi tinatago na kontak number sa pamilya nmin dhil bwal daw lahat in 6months deduction while we still paying our debt..


Jann Espadera Torremoro: My agency is nation too, we clean the whole house every day and we clean the floor using cloth only cannot use the mop, and if they find u sleep after lunch they give punishment to clean the floor 50x by hand not using mop at all


Judmaechrijp Barila Daligdig: My agency also like tht..
Thy treat as like animals not human...
Grrrrrr...


Sketcher Sucaldito: Ay ganyan din agency q,tpx f u wnt 2 transfr,d ka papayagan..mumurahn kpa ng may ari at mga staft..tpx dun kpa za c0ndo nla mgww0rk hbng d kpa napick up ng amu m0.nanakt ung mayari..xbi nga nla,pur0 Bad rec0rd n agency q.dmi na umuwi.


Einie Pineda: Huh agency are all lier.i also ecperience it in my agency before one bowl og noodles for 3person..pur food really like animaks food..


Vivian Bordago Martisano: Tama ang agency nag advice sa employer na bawal ang celphone cla muna kaya unahin kc yung ibang employer sumusunod sa kanila..


Dhena Rose Porras Clarito: Ofcourse if they need to pay the charges they will deny it...bloody hell


Elena Casilang Biason: Hay salamat sa dios at ang aking agency na Human Dynamics di ako nakaranas ng ganyan o anumang mali na trato nila. Mabait ang me ari ng agency naun. Halimbawa pg dating ng maid 2day kibukasan ng hapon ipa pick up na xa agad sa amo. 
2001 ako dumating noon. Now gusto ko ng mg 4gud tinawagan ang agency ko na .
HUMAN DYNAMICS
Sinabi sa amo ko me new rules now were following a new rules. MAID is no salary deduction evryweek day off at new comers sahod 500 with xperience 550-600 Gusto kasi kuha ng kapalit ko si amo ko pg aalis nako.


Delma Rapol: The maid won't lie if its not true. She come here to work and nothing more. I'm sure she already spent so much money just to come here to work and not just making up bad story about the agency and stuff. Of course they can tell to the other maids what to tell and do when the reporter arrives to investigate the case. The best way to find out if the maid is telling the truth is to put one maid to pretend as one of the other maids there for at least a week or two to find out the truth, not just come and go...


Alma Pontrivida Placencia: nation agency!!!yup totoo yan pagkain doon parang pagkain nng baboy..araw araw repolyo at kanin...walang kape sa umaga...makapagkape ka lang f my pera ka bili ka sa canten.....


Cris Canitan: Madam sylvia s katong gnun dn..lunch&dinner always baked beans,3taong sbay mligo,puro sigawan mrinig..pinay p ang in charge pro kung umasta prang cno.


Ashley Quirante: Swift arrow lage cabbage tas may surot pa tas cnicigawan mga indo tinitipid pa mga katulong sa food hai nko talaga


Teresita Espiritu Yabes: Di mmn lahat agency deto sa singapore swertihan din..my mg agency nmn na good for transfer..pag ng stay ka sa kanila.....


Ladybird Sweetie: Ganyan nman ibang agency tlga kahit sa agency q nagstay aq 1 mnth nagbabayad kami 10 dlr per day para sa pagkain nmin taz singilin kpa ng 300 dlr sa pagstay ko ng 1mnth obligado kpng maglinis akalain u 1 buong manok ulam nmin ng 3 days sa dami nmin 10 dlr un lng oh my god anong klase ba mga agency e2....



Maids Forced Into Debt Bondage in Singapore4 July 2014
In August last year, the government launched a pilot project that sent 220 women to work as maids in Singapore, the first major effort to open up a new market for Cambodia’s domestic workers after the government halted sending maids to Malaysia due to persistent reports of abuse.

This week, two of the maids involved in the Singapore pilot returned to Cambodia with stories of forced debt bondage and abusive conditions, once again raising serious doubts about whether the rights of Cambodian migrants can be guaranteed by the well-connected recruitment agencies sending them abroad.

Nhem Thida, 31, and Phorn Mao, 24, were lured from their rural homes by Philimore Cambodia—a recruitment agency previously accused of a litany of human rights abuses—with promises of fair salaries and first-world conditions.

But soon after they landed in Singapore late last year, they realized those promises were lies.  “First, when I arrived in Singapore, the agency took my passport,” said Ms. Mao, one of seven children from a rice-farming family in Kompong Thom’s Prasat Sambor distict.  “I was told to sign a contract stating that my first six months’ salary would be paid to Philimore.”

That contract, a copy of which was obtained last month, stipulates that the migrant worker must, for the first six months of employment, pay $320 of her $385 salary to Philimore through the Singaporean moneylender SME Care. The interest rate on the loan is 20 percent.

Ms. Thida said she was made to sign a contract with the same terms.  After completing the paperwork, the two women said they were placed in a training center run by Singaporean maid agency Nation Employment, where they each stayed for about a month, waiting to be matched with employers.

“We had to sleep in a bed with four or five people every night and there were about 50 people in each room with the beds stacked three-high,” Ms. Mao said. “There were more than 100 women in one building—from Philippines, Indonesia, [Burma] and Cambodia.”

During the day, according to the women, they were expected to perform household duties in the center as prospective employers browsed the maids on offer.  “They trained me how to clean toilets properly,” said Ms. Thida, a single mother from Svay Rieng’s Svay Teap district.

“You must use two hands to show your strength because the employers are watching.”  After being selected by an employer, the situation improved for the women. Upon being chosen, there was generally more food and more sleeping space, they said, but conditions were not as good as Philimore had led them to believe.

Both women spoke of 18-hour workdays, sparse meals, occasional abuse and restrictive living conditions.  Philimore told me I would have a private room, a mobile phone and a day off every week,” Ms. Mao said. “But things were very different to what they said.”

“I asked my employer for just one day off per month. But he said, ‘No need, cannot.’”  Singapore’s Ministry of Manpower, in both a maid handbook and a guide for employers, states that domestic workers must be allowed one day’s rest each week.  The ministry could not be reached for comment Thursday.

Hoh Seah Li, manager of Nation Employment, refuted the women’s claims of bed sharing, but declined to answer further questions.  Ms. Hoh said that women get “one bed each,” before adding, “You do not have the authority to ask me these questions.”  “We will not take any more Cambodian maids and we have many other nationalities to choose [from],” she said, before hanging up.

Chan Pheakdey, a representative of Philimore in Phnom Penh, said he was not convinced Ms. Mao and Ms. Thida’s stories were true. He said labor regulations in Singapore ensured the women’s safety.  “We have not received any irregularities or complaints from Singapore so far,” Mr. Pheakdey said, referring questions about the loan contract and the conditions at Nation’s training centers to Ung Seang Rithy, chairwoman of the Association of Cambodian Recruitment Agencies (ACRA).

Ms. Seang Rithy—the sister of General Sok Phal, who was in April sworn in as head of a new Interior Ministry department charged with monitoring migrant workers—also said the women would be protected by Singaporean law.

“It doesn’t seem that there are any problems,” she said. “I think that Singapore is very strict with law enforcement.”  Ms. Seang Rithy declined to comment on the loan contract and the conditions for maids sent by her member agencies, referring questions to the ministries of labor and foreign affairs.  Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Koy Kuong said the victims should file an official complaint and referred further questions to the Ministry of Labor.

Seng Sakada, director-general of the Labor Ministry’s labor department, declined to comment.

Mr. Sakada, to whom all questions regarding issues with migrant maids are referred from within the ministry, has his own interest in the trade. His daughter, Seng Toussita, is listed as the owner of recruitment agency Sok Leap Metrey—the third firm participating in the Singapore pilot project. (Winter:  一手遮天 有钱自己赚)

At a workshop for recruitment agencies in March, Pin Vireak, a secretary at ACRA, said Mr. Sakada himself chose the three agencies to have exclusive rights to the Singapore pilot.  The Ministry of Labor has declined to make available a copy of any agreement between Cambodia and Singapore, despite the urgings of CNRP lawmakers-elect Mu Sochua and Son Chhay.

Local rights group Licadho, which helped repatriate Ms. Mao and Ms. Thida, said Thursday that little had changed for migrant maids since Prime Minister Hun Sen put a moratorium on sending maids to Malaysia in 2011 after a spate of similar complaints.

Licadho president Naly Pilorge said the powerful government figures involved in the trade made outside authorities reluctant to interfere.  “The lack of any prosecutions against maid recruitment agencies under the anti-trafficking law provisions demonstrates that impunity in this sector remains a concern,” she added.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lack of Cambodian maids in Singapore, The Straits Times, 27 May 2014

A pilot project to recruit maids from Cambodia is struggling to take off as workers are turned off by high recruitment fees, and the fear of not being able to adapt to life here.

Under a Ministry of Manpower (MOM) pilot scheme that began last August, Cambodian maids are, for the first time, allowed to work in Singapore.  The ministry had set a target of 400 maids to arrive by February but only about 200 are in Singapore now, based on figures from the Cambodian Embassy.

This has prompted MOM to push the deadline to August for Cambodian and Singapore agents to bring in all 400 maids.  But even with the extension, agents here are worried that their Cambodian counterparts will not be able to recruit enough workers.

Singapore maid agents blame the high placement fees of $2,400 that the women pay to Cambodian agents to get jobs in Singapore.  Maid agency Inter-Mares Management Services owner Karl Tan said: "No doubt the maids can earn much more here. But $2,400 is a lot of money to them, as many earn only about $1,000 a year back at home."

Maids earn at least $450 a month here. In contrast, a typical Cambodian factory worker takes home about US$100 (S$125) a month.  High-profile cases of abuse involving Cambodian maids in Malaysia in recent years have also discouraged some of the women from coming here, said agents.

Those cases led to the Cambodian government announcing a temporary ban on maids working in Malaysia in 2011. This has yet to be lifted.  Meanwhile, Cambodian maid recruiter Lao Ly Hock said he finds it difficult to recruit maids who have attended school for at least eight years, which is a requirement set by MOM.  "If the requirement is lowered to five years of education, we would be able to recruit more maids," he said.

The aim of the MOM pilot scheme, which ends next year, is to see if Cambodia workers are suitable for Singapore households, and if the country can be added to the list of approved sources for maids.  Currently, approved source countries and territories for foreign maids in Singapore include Bangladesh, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Macau, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, South Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand.

When contacted, Cambodian ambassador to Singapore Cheth Naren said the three Cambodian agents, who include Mr Lao, involved in the project are "confident" of meeting the extended August deadline. He added that about 30 maids will arrive in Singapore in the next few weeks.

Maid agencies here, however, said the three agents have not been responsive to their requests. They suggested that the Cambodian labour ministry allow more Cambodian agents to recruit maids to work in Singapore.

Mr Ronnie Toh, owner of maid agency AC Toh Enterprises, said: "We will have more choices of companies to work with. With more competition, the agents may be encouraged to lower their recruitment fees too."  Last month, Cambodian newspaper The Phnom Penh Post reported that some maids working in Singapore have complained to the embassy here about poor work conditions.

Mr Naren confirmed, in a e-mail statement, that one maid had accused her employer's relative of molesting her. However, she decided not to lodge a police report and has been transferred to a new employer.  He said that, given time, the workers should be able to adapt to life in Singapore and urged employers to be patient.  "Some of the domestic workers are homesick. Allowing them to call home will do wonders for them. They may perform better too," said Mr Naren.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nov 2013

The trial to hire Cambodian maid is in slow progress. Six authorized agents can bring in a total of 400 workers but because of the slow recruitment by local agents, Cambodian maids who have come to Spore who have reached Spore were only about 20% of the intended strength.

Maid Agencies originally estimated the first batch of Cambodian maids to start from June. While many employers wished to employ Cambodian maids, some even have placed a deposit but supply was delayed till around the end of August. Some agents have less than five Cambodian maids so the originally interested Cambodian maid's employers are unwilling to wait any longer, have decided to hire maids from other source countries.

Cambodia is a new source country for supply of domestic helpers. In January this year, the Ministry of Manpower has invited maid agencies to participate in this pilot scheme. These six selected operators will recruit FDWs from Cambodia within this six months. Maid agents shall collect feedback from employers who have participated in the pilot scheme so that MOM can decide whether to approve Cambodia as a source country to supply FDWs.

AEAS has proposed to MOM for the hiring of Cambodian maids in year 2004 but MOM was reluctant due to the local women's education level wasn’t high – failed to meet minimum eight years of formal education and possesses the necessary educational certificates as documentary proof of her education . Due to the maid agencies’ repeated requests, MOM decided to launch a pilot scheme and assess whether Cambodian maids are suitable as domestic helpers.

One agency has only brought in one worker since the programme kicked off in May, while the other two said they have brought in “a handful”. Their counterparts in Cambodia claim “political strife” was limiting their ability to send workers here, the agencies said.

“The crux of the problem is that there are only three agencies in Cambodia for this pilot, so supply is rigidly controlled and we are at their discretion,” said Mr Ronnie Toh, owner of A C Toh Enterprises, one of the six participating agencies. “It is quite frustrating, because we are hungry for the workers, and they are all good and well-trained,” he added.The trial to hire Cambodian maid is in slow progress. Six authorized agents can bring in a total of 400 workers but because of the slow recruitment by local agents, Cambodian maids who have come to Spore who have reached Spore were only about 20% of the intended strength.

Maid Agencies originally estimated the first batch of Cambodian maids to start from June. While many employers wished to employ Cambodian maids, some even have placed a deposit but supply was delayed till around the end of August. Some agents have less than five Cambodian maids so the originally interested Cambodian maid's employers are unwilling to wait any longer, have decided to hire maids from other source countries.

Cambodia is a new source country for supply of domestic helpers. In January this year, the Ministry of Manpower has invited maid agencies to participate in this pilot scheme. These six selected operators will recruit FDWs from Cambodia within this six months. Maid agents shall collect feedback from employers who have participated in the pilot scheme so that MOM can decide whether to approve Cambodia as a source country to supply FDWs.

“The selection of Cambodian recruitment agencies is solely the prerogative of the Cambodian government. The MOM will not interfere in the domestic FDW supply processes in Cambodia, as this constitutes part of the ground situation for a realistic assessment of Cambodia as a potential new source of FDWs.”

Inter-Mares maid agency head Chen Jiaxiang lamented that his agency has no Cambodian maids. Till date, he is still waiting for local agency to make arrangements. He added that the approved local maid agency in Cambodia were only three, thus, restricted the supply of maids.

Ms Connie Sim of Prestige Management Services, another participating agency, said the trickle of maids from Cambodia is understandable. “Singapore has very high standards for domestic workers, so we’re looking at hiring those who have had experience in Malaysia,” she noted. “It’s a pilot project, and we want to make sure the girls are well taken care of and proper regulations followed.”

The agencies suggested that more agencies in Cambodia be roped into the programme to boost supply. The pilot is scheduled to run until 2015. If successful, Cambodia could be added to the MOM’s list of approved source countries and territories for maids, lowering Singapore’s dependence on maids from the Philippines and Indonesia.

Responding to queries, an MOM spokesperson said: “The objective of the pilot scheme is to assess if Cambodian foreign domestic workers (FDWs) are suitable to work in Singapore households, and Cambodia as a viable source country.

“The selection of Cambodian recruitment agencies is solely the prerogative of the Cambodian government. The MOM will not interfere in the domestic FDW supply processes in Cambodia, as this constitutes part of the ground situation for a realistic assessment of Cambodia as a potential new source of FDWs.”

Other maid agency who have participated in the pilot scheme are Skills & Resources and Unique Agency. A total of more than 30 maid agencies enrolled but only six were selected.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
23 Sep - Cambodian maids raring to go, Straits Times, 22 Sep
At 5am, without any alarm clock going off, a dozen Cambodian maids wake up with near-military precision. Over the next hour, the women sweep, wash and scrub spotless their two-storey training centre in the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh.

They all want to be maids in Singapore, eager to earn enough to supplement their families’ meagre income. A handful arrived in Singapore homes last week, and about 400 are expected by the end of the year. Cambodian maids are being allowed into Singapore for the first time, under a Manpower Ministry pilot scheme. The authorities will monitor how well they adapt to life here and if all goes well, Cambodia will be added to the list of approved sources for maids, joining countries like the Philippines, Indonesia and Myanmar.

Maid agencies in Singapore said demand for Cambodians has been heating up. About 40 employers have placed deposits of about S$500 each to secure a worker, said Nation Employment’s managing director Gary Chin. “Employers are interested in Cambodian maids because many have experience working in Malaysia,” he said.

The women are eager to escape poverty at home. Jobs for women in Cambodia are limited mostly to working in factories or as maids, and both jobs pay barely US$120 a month. As maids in Singapore, they can expect at least S$450 a month.

The jobs come at a cost though. The women pay S$2,400 in placement fees to recruitment agents and expect to clear the debt in instalments over six months. The women hope that what they earn in Singapore will allow them to buy farmland, renovate village homes and put their younger siblings through school.

Among those heading to Singa­pore is Mork Banou, 23. The eldest of five children, she went to Malaysia to work as a maid in 2009, speaking almost no English. Determined to improve, she studied by herself every night, memorising and reading English words aloud. Within three months, she was getting by in English.

Many of the women said they managed to save more than S$10,000 after their stints in Malaysia. Thol Sreymach, 26, said she saved $15,000 after working there for four years and it went towards the school fees and living expenses of her four younger sisters. She hopes to save even more after she arrives in Singapore later this month.

But labour activists in Cambodia worry that the women will have problems adjusting to life in Singapore and that Singapore employers will be frustrated by the women’s weak command of English. “The life in Singapore is so different from village life. The domestic workers will face difficulties in adapting,” said activist Mom Sokchar. For now, women like Banou are looking forward to their new lives in Singapore. “Working in Singapore will help my family get a better life,” she said.


2 Sep - Cambodian maid pilot project is finalized. A total of 400 Cambodian maids expected to arrive by end of this month. MOM invited operators to take part in the pilot scheme at the beginning of this year and in April, selected 6 maid agencies. Cambodian maids were supposed to arrive in July but delayed for 2 months. Their arrival will help to ease the demand for maids. Currently, out of 200,000 FDWs, 70,000 are Filipinos.

Cambodian maid's starting salary will be at least $450 per month, the same as Indonesian maid. Most of the Cambodian maids are ex-Malaysia so they have relevant working experience and can speak a bit of English or Malay. Employers do not need to pay for maid’s placement fee because the maids will be paying their placement fee thru monthly installment. It is estimated that employers are required to pay maid agency around $1600 – non refundable.


Winter: This is great, employer need not fork out one-time maid loan because placement will be paid with loan from finance firm. I doubt maid agencies willing to earn lesser and chase maid for payment.  End of the day, still made employers foot maid loan for their convenience. I'm willing to hire an experience Cambodian maid at S$450 if she has learnt to speak some Mandarin and English. I can't speak Malay so if she can only understand mother tougue and Malay... end up like another M, chicken and duck, no way.

It looks better to get Cambodia maids because they are uncommon in Spore .... 400 Cambodian FDWs vs the influential Filipino and Indonesian FDWs.... don't you think it is better? But to pay an inexperienced Cambodian maid minimum S$420, higher than Myanmese, both nationalities known to be unable to communicate in basic English, how to work with them? 

I must admit, I am not an ideal employer who has patience to train FDW, enjoy a chicken & duck relationship and leave my girl alone with a her, expect her to learn, be smart and independant like Filipinos ... with one month intensive training.  Spent 4 months with M (my ex-Indonesian maid), I realised Indonesians are known to be slow by nature, not easy to re-programme them to work faster... most FDWs (in fact ... all nationalities) do not desperately need a job, there's nothing to drive them to work harder and faster (productive).  The MOM policies are to their advantage.  Employers cannot simply fire any FDW, absorb the losses of FDW who refuse to perform (not that she cannot do a proper job, she just stubbornly refused to co-operative thinking that's part of her human rights), as per job requirements.

Visit Nation and pay $1800 as agency fee, crazy, just like daylight robbery! 

Pay more do not mean employers will get trained and maids of better quality cum ideal working attitude.  Employers .... I forsee are just paying more but getting more headaches and unfair treatment!  The sad fact is our MOM is all the way backing the maid agents and FDWs.... helping and collaborated with them to milk the employers in whichever way they fancy!
 
Note: In October 2011, Prime Minister Hun Sen banned the sending of Cambodian domestic workers to Malaysia after mounting reports of abuse and inhumane working conditions.  But Cambodian maids are still entering Malaysia despite ban, believe these Cambodian women arrived in Malaysia to work through third countries.  Now that Spore is better option for Cambodian FDW, I believe more will come thru maid agencies.  No matter what, when compared to Myanmese maids, their English equally bad but if they had experience in Malaysia, it makes these ex-Malaysia FDWs more desireable.  Given an option, I don't want to employ Filipino or Indonesian because they are too common in Spore.  The moment you step out of your house, you get to meet either a Filipino or Indonesian maid.  If there's a suitable ex-Malaysia maid, understands English and wants to be employed by me to look after my girl, I will definitely hire her.  What I need is a good helper, not somebody so yaya, untrainable, thought I owe her a good life in Spore and tried all means to manage me. 

We need more source countries. Believe many employers feel the same as me, we do not want Filipinos or Indonesians to think they are the only maids available, thought they are the best and we must give in to their demands in order to employ them.  The source countries and maids must know we, FDW's Employers have plenty of choices so we need MOM help us by stop being so pro-maid, over friendly to Philippines and Indonesia.  MOM has to safeguard our interests, we are the citizens, MOM must remember this!   By treating FDWs more human than us, treat us like ATM machines, PAP think you deserve our votes for the next election?  I don't want to sound so anti-govt but do I have a choice?  Have you been kind to me all these years?  Either as FDW's employer or a special needs parent, I can't feel your concern.



Cambodian maids to earn at least $420 a month    source

Placement fee will be paid with loan from finance firm, not by employer
Published on May 30, 2013, Straits Times 
Some of the maids the Singapore agents met at a training centre in Phnom Penh earlier this month. The agents were told that there are 14,000 Cambodian maids who have returned home from Malaysia. -- PHOTO: NATION EMPLOYMENT AGENCY
SALARIES which start at $420, and no placement fees from employers.
These proposals were part of a document the Cambodian government sent to selected maid agents, as Singapore moves ahead with a pilot scheme to see how well Cambodian maids adapt to life here.
The scheme, which runs until the end of 2015, will see its first batch of 400 maids arrive in July this year.

Cambodia has proposed employment terms for these maids in a memorandum of understanding (MOU), which was sent this week to the six maid agents picked by the Manpower Ministry to recruit the maids.
Workers with no experience will get a minimum of $420 a month.

Those with experience will be paid at least $450. If the maid works on all her four rest days each month, she has to be paid another $70.

Also, employers will not have to pay the maid's placement fees upfront, similar to the recruitment scheme Jakarta introduced for Indonesian maids last year.
Under the previous system, employers paid these fees, and recoup them by deducting from the maid's monthly salary.

Instead, the placement fees, which will amount to around $2,500 and include the cost of training and profit for agents, will be paid for by loans from a Cambodian financial firm. The maids will repay the loans through monthly instalments.

The Singapore agents told The Straits Times that the terms were on a par with those for Indonesian and Filipino maids, who make up the bulk of domestic workers in Singapore. Monthly salaries for Indonesian maids start at $450, while Filipino maids get at least $500. The Straits Times understands that the agents will sign the MOU by next week.

Nation Employment managing director Gary Chin, who travelled with the five other Singapore agents to Phnom Penh earlier this month, was impressed by the maids he met. "Their English is quite good. Some spoke Mandarin and Chinese dialects which they picked up from working in Malaysia," he said.

The agents were told that there are 14,000 Cambodian maids who have returned home from Malaysia, which has been employing Cambodian maids for nearly a decade, and can come here to work.
Still, some industry players have questioned the proposed loan scheme for placement fees. They feel it is unlikely that any finance firm in Cambodia would be interested in the project because of its relatively small scale.

Ms Bridget Tan, chief executive of the foreign workers' group Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (Home), said the $2,500 fee was excessive. The fee's profit margin will be split between the Singapore and Cambodian agents.
"It probably takes just $200 or so to train and provide accommodation for the maids. The cost of living in Cambodia is quite low," she said, urging agents to lower their profits

Meanwhile, the Singapore agents have started to offer Cambodian maids here.
Nation Employment has a handful of employers who have already paid agency fees of about $1,800 to ensure that they get a maid by July.
One of them is accountant E. Lee, 54. She said: "I think Cambodian maids can be a good alternative to Indonesians or Filipinos. My agent said the worker I will get has experience working in Malaysia. I am hopeful that she will adapt and work well here."


JACKNGSC - Good alternative for Singapore Families, it is just too high cost for the placement fee to hire a Pinoy helper.
I agree that there is not justification for the maid levy whereby our govt is not the one who incurred the cost, but the employer, and all liabilities is on the employer. 
 
Dante - What about the 'maid levy', that is paid EVERY MONTH to the government?
Why should one who hires a maid, whom the latter eats, sleeps and uses the hirer's water and electricity, STILL needs to pay the bloody government MONTHLY?
A check on the MOM website ONLY shows the amount of the levy, when it is due, how it is paid through. There is NO 'why' stated. So why are we paying for it?
Bloody blood-sucking government who only knows how to come up with blood-sucking policies. Is our government run by a group of vampires?
exactly; what's the logic behind the levy?


* + * + * + *+ * + *
Regardless you're in Spore or Malaysia, Employers are proned to face bad maid agencies and FDWs.  Don't assume maids are dumb and submissive, they learn new tricks from friends or via technology.  Maids are very scheming and this could be their real personality but they are too good in acting so Employers only managed to discover after living with them for some time.  Some were so good in their acting and employers only found out what their maids did after they were gone.
Costly and disappointing experience with Cambodian maid, 26 Jan 2011, by Kenny in Malaysia

We got a maid from Cambodia through a big local agency, located in Petaling Jaya.  We were "lucky" because our maid was very young (she told us she was 18 although her passport said 21, and she later told us that her real name was not what was in the passport as well) and therefore we managed to teach her English and even some Malay quite easily.

Unfortunately, she was very childish, watched a lot of TV, played a lot with our two-year-old daughter's toys, refusing to wake up on time, arguing back, etc.

We were OK with the childishness but could not put up with the waking up late (even past 8am,) and arguing back, as these actually caused problems as she would delay cooking our daughter's food, and was sometimes even unable to sweep and mop our small apartment before my daughter woke up.

We mentioned these problems to the agency and they "frightened" us by saying if we wanted to change the maid, we would need to wait a long time and we have to pay a lot of extra fees (About another RM2k, in addition to the over RM8000 that we already paid).  Because of this, we decided to just keep her as we could not afford to fork out so much more to replace a maid we had for just a week.

We did take her again after about six months for them to "counsel" her about waking up early (We only asked her to start working before 7am, although the agency actually said maids should wake up at 5:30am every day).

However, about a month later (seven months after she came here), we realised that the maid was switching off our CCTV and making calls to Cambodia while everyone was asleep (we received an RM900+ bill).  We confronted her and she denied this.  We explained to her that the CCTV has a 15 second record time after there is no movement, and we know she always approaches the CCTV before it suddenly stops recording (just before each call was made).  She just kept quiet. We checked her phone book, and true enough almost all the numbers that were called from our houseline were in her book.

She also had the word 'camera' on the same page. We decided we had to send her back to the agency. My wife checked her bag before we left and found that she had stolen quite a bit of my mother's jewellery, and stashed it in one of her bags.  We sent her back and the agency said they would look into the matter. A few days later, they called me back to say that she admitted to doing everything and asked if we wanted to take her back.

I told the agent that we do not know what else she did when she switched off the CCTV and the fact that she did all this to us even though we treated her like our own daughter, made it impossible for us to take her back again.  Then the agency said they will arrange to send her back, but I would not get any form of compensation, not even the RM900 for the bill).  

The agent also told me that if I made a police report, the police can issue me a summons for allowing my maid to "run away", which is quite ridiculous as the maid is with them.  I would just like to know if there is any way for me to recover any part of the roughly RM9,000 (over RM8,000 for agency fees & loan and another RM900+ for the phone bill) when the agreement is completely one-sided. 


* + * + * + *+ * + *
3 Feb

Q:  Are you tempted to be one of the pioneers to hire Cambodian maid?

Ans:  If they are hardworking, highly trainable, adaptive to our culture, can understand my instructions, salary reasonable, low maid loan and agency fee not expensive, of course can try.  I hope Cambodian FDWs sincerely come to work and not to play hard at our expenses.

Q:  Cambodians have worked in Malaysia for nearly a decade, why Spore so ‘outdated’?
Ans:  Cambodian maids received less than 8 years of education, don't meet MOM's requirements.  Cambodians need to be trained and must learn simple English so that they can adjust to working life in Singapore.  Source country not keen to deploy citizens to a place that previously had no weekly off days.

Q:  How to choose a suitable Cambodian maid?
Ans:  Cambodian maids are new to Singapore but they have been working in Malaysia for nearly a decade so try to get those who had worked in Malaysia.  They are likely to understand a bit Malay.  When interviewing new maids, they must know they're coming to a country of different customs and practices.  Lifestyle is totally different from theirs.

Q:  What’s the starting salary of Cambodian maid?
Ans:  Agents expect Cambodian domestic workers to be paid the market rate of between S$400 and $450 a month.

Q: Where to find translation?
Ans: Try Google translator khmer/English or http://www.english-khmer.com/.  There are a few free websites so do a search.

Q:  What's Cambodian's staple food?
Ans:  Rice.  Same as Filipino and Indonesian.  Some of them insist must have rice for each meal. 

Q:  What other languages can Cambodian speak?
Ans:  Cambodian Chinese generally speaks Chinese dialects ie Teochew or Cantonese.  Some speaks Mandarin.  Btw, there are Myanmese Chinese FDW in Spore who reads and speaks Mandarin.  Due to language barrier, new Cambodian maids (totally no experience) will take time to communicate with you as well as people of different nationalities.  It means they cannot gossip or make new friends as freely and easily as Filipinos or Indonesians.  Language barrier can be a plus because nobody (no friends or relatives on Spore) can understand them without giving them lots of patience and put in an extra effort to listen to them.  It makes it harder for them to mingle around so they may be less vocal and afraid to be too friendly to strangers.  She is likely to focus her attention on work rather than make new friends, compare benefits and give employers headaches.  If you compensate her for no weekly off day and treats her well, don't let her feel lonely or ill-treated, I believe Cambodian FDWs can be guai-guai good helpers .... unpolluted.

* + * + * + *+ * + *
We refer to the letter (“Is the Cambodian maid pilot scheme fair?”, Feb 28 2013) where Ms Alice Cheah opined that the Ministry of Manpower’s (MOM) selection of six employment agencies in a pilot to assess the suitability of Cambodian foreign domestic workers (FDWs) was anti-competitive.

We reiterated during the industry briefing early last month that the purpose of the pilot is to assess if Cambodian FDWs are suitable for work in Singaporean homes and if there is demand for them.

The size of the pilot was kept deliberately small, about 400 FDWs, to facilitate effective monitoring and assessment of the trial. Correspondingly, the number of agencies to be selected for the placement of these FDWs will also be kept small, at no more than six. It would be impractical to have every FDW-placing agency participate in a pilot of this scale.
The pilot does not evaluate the performance of the selected employment agencies. Should Cambodia become an approved source country, all agencies will be able to recruit and place Cambodian FDWs with employers in Singapore.

During the pilot, Cambodian FDWs will be allowed to seek a change in employer through their agencies. If an FDW is unable to find another employer, she will have to return home. This is no different for FDWs from the existing approved source countries.
Agencies participating in the pilot will have to make this clear to the Cambodian FDWs and their employers.

* + * + * + *+ * + *
This was extracted from a Malaysian employer’s blog. It is a case where new employers are likely to face.

It would sound familiar to employers of Myanmese, the inability to speak and understand English.

Called the agent, Miss Wong.

1. I demanded to speak to the manager but to no avail. Then, I had to speak to Miss Wong first. I explained the problems to her. In short, I told her for >RM11K, they got me someone unacceptable (in my heart- as if mute and deaf). Wong was not helpful at all. She did not apologise but kept saying I should give Kh (maid) 3 to 6 months to catch up.

2. I insisted I must speak to the manager/ boss. They said the boss was not around and passed the line to the 'manager' (who knows who she really is).

3. Our conversation:-
Q- Did you all say Kh could use simple English?
A- Yes, she understands simple English. If you ask her how old she is OR what's her name, she can tell you.
(Sorry, pardon me. Who cares?)

Q- But, you see. She should know simple words like put, take, etc... common things like cup, spoon, bag, etc...
A- You see, all these you must teach her. From the biodata, it shows she only went to school 2 years, you cannot expect her to understand SO MANY things. You should check, you understand or not?

Q- But she's going to work in a house, these are the most basic words. And how do you expect her to work for me when she does not understand a thing?
A- We have brought in many maids before and NEVER had any problems, if you are calling me to complain about her English, you are WASTING my time. I have more important things to do, I am very busy, you know? (Rude).

Q- At least you all must be honest, don't simply say she understands simple English, big and small are very simple, and she doesn't even know. ( I still expect her to apologise and admit that they were not totally honest but tried to mislead me with the 'simple English' issue)
A- You should have used video-conferencing with her and find out yourself.

Q-What? If we could do that, the agent, Miss Wong should have offered or suggested.
A- Ya... We would only offer if any clients request. (For heaven's sake, who would have thought of this? and then it's not a genuine offer, is it?)

Q- And you all said she was trained in Cambodia and trained again here before being handed over to me.
How do you explain she doesn't know HOW to change a bedsheet? That she put my clean bedsheet on top of my old bedsheet on the bed, without even removing the old one?
And the clothes she ironed were as if they were just taken out from the washing machine?
A- Yes, we train the maids, if you are not happy, you can send her back again , we can train her one more time. If you are going to talk about all these that are not so important, I think you better come to my office and we can talk face-to-face. Please do not waste my time over the phone.

The maid,
1. Did not know simple English (spoon? big? small? also don't know. )
2. Does not know how to read time/ use an alarm clock (what time? )
3. Did not read simple English (mop, sweep, wash, put, take...)
4. Does not know how to read a calendar/ what day it is (although given a calendar)


* + * + * + *+ * + *
Maid in 'abuse' case defends employer, The New Paper, Apr 2012

Maids have been the target of employers, who sometimes physically abuse them for not doing a "proper job".But a Cambodian maid in Kuala Lumpur has sprung to the defence of her employer after the maid's mother alleged that she was mistreated.

Miss Phorn Sophea said the allegations by her mother, 52-year-old Im Meoun, against her employer Cynthia Lim, 45, were not true, The Star reported.  Last month, Ms Lim, 45, was alerted to a story in Cambodian newspaper Phnom Penh Post, which ran the mother's allegations. Ms Im claimed that her daughter was given only one meal a day and that she was forced to take drugs designed to give her more energy to work.

The mother also filed a complaint with The Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association, a non-governmental organisation in Cambodia.  The allegations surfaced when Ms Lim was in the process of renewing Miss Phorn's contract after the maid said that she wanted to continue working for the family.

Shortly after the allegations surfaced, Ms Lim and her husband, Mr Hong Chin Heng, were cleared by the Cambodian embassy in Malaysia. But Ms Phorn's mother stuck to her allegations and even told a Khmer-language newspaper that she was threatened and told to withdraw her statement.

This prompted Ms Lim to call a press conference so that Miss Phorn could clear the air.  Said Miss Phorn: "I don't take drugs and my employer treats me very good."

Ms Lim added: "I hope we can close this case," saying that she planned to write to the newspapers and the Cambodian human rights group to clear her name.  She said she hoped her case would raise awareness on the possibility of employers being unfairly accused by their maids' family members.

She also claimed that neither the Cambodian newspapers nor the rights group had contacted her to get her side of the story.  


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2 comments:

  1. Where to find good Cambodian maid agency?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beware of Cambodian maid. They are very cunning and will always lies. One maid even told me that she was thought to say she was raped or molest in order to go back. Beware

    ReplyDelete

This blog is not meant for screw-lose activists or loans. My blog aims to gather all FDWs' news scattered everywhere, become a one-stop site for mentally & financially bullied FDWs' employer to beware and learn. Don't pollute this blog with your pro-maid, insensible and selfish comments! Activists posting here are BLIND IDIOTS, IRRITATING freaks and deliberately showing no RESPECT for others... robbing our only breathing space.